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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
to talk specifics about how to avoid the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner said there's been no progress in the last two weeks. and the u.n. general assembly voted to recognize palestine as a non-member observer state. the u.s. was one of only nine states voting no. and, you've heard the term "glacial pace"? not exactly, says one director who's scaled enough ice, to know better. hari sreenivasan has more. >> sreenivasan: filmmaker james balog spent years documenting dramatic changes in arctic glaciers. i talked with him about his documentary "chasing ice." that's our science thursday feature. on art beat, digital touchups and tricks are common in photography today. we talk to a curator at the metropolitan museum of art about an exhibit that explores the history of photo manipulation before photoshop. plus, on making sense, economics correspondent paul solman ponders government versus private spending. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. ray? >> brown: and again, to our >> suarez: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm ray suarez. >> brown: and i'm jeffre
. wall street initially fell after house speaker boehner said there'd been no progress on a fiscal cliff deal. but stocks rose later, on news that the economy grew at an annual rate of 2.7% in the third quarter. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 36 points to close well above 13,021. the nasdaq rose 20 points to close at 3,012. the united nations general assembly voted today to recognize palestine as a non- member observer state. the tally was 138 to nine, with 41 abstentions. the u.s. voted no. it came after palestinian president mahmoud abbas appealed to the world body to issue the birth certificate of palestine. >> we did not come here seeking to delegitimize a state established years ago, and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and this is palestine. >> sreenivasan: palestinians said the vote would strengthen their hand in future peace talks with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abb
? >> i think on the fiscal cliff, the president and john boehner spoke of the weekend. i think it was the second consecutive weekend when they spoke. 28-minute conversation, variously described as curt or short. people already suspect that boehner's strong reaction against the proposal that was sent up today was something they planned together, because now boehner can say this crazy, outrageous proposal, and i don't think so. i'm very pessimistic about a resolution. i might be one of the only ones. >> i am, too. given everything that we've covered over the last couple of years, you saw what happened with the debt ceiling, for example. i mean, there was, in the lame-duck session after the 2010 midterms, there was sort of a productive lame-duck session. but then again, the president was accused of caving. so the bush tax cuts were extended. >> the atmosphere has not changed despite the electric, in that we do live in a washington right now where we don't do big things anymore. they take too much leadership, it's incremental. i'm pessimistic about this idea that we'll have a grand
.b.r." >> susie: the fiscal cliff talks are going nowhere. that's the word from john boehner today. the house speaker characterized the negotiations to avoid huge tax increases and spending cuts at a stalemate. the race to solve the fiscal cliff triggered another round of dramatic sound bites from republicans and president obama. darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: the president is still pushing to wrap up a deal on the fiscal cliff before christmas and just in case anyone missed that point, he visited a toy factory to urge congress to avoid raising taxes on the middle class. >> that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. a typical middle-class family of four would see their income taxes go up by about $2,200. >> reporter: the president is proposing to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion, while cutting spending by $400 billion. on top of that, mr. obama asked for $50 billion more for infrastructure spending and $140 billion to extend unemployment insurance benefits and the payroll tax cut. republicans literally laughed it off. >> they want... they wa
of the session when house speaker john boehner expressed disappointment over the pace of fiscal cliff negotiations. the index shrugged it off, ending higher by four tenths of a percent. volume was 677 million shares on the big board; under 1.8 billion moved on the nasdaq. all ten of the major stock sectors rose. the telecommunications sector had the strongest gain, up nine tenths of a percent. the health care, materials and utilities sectors were each higher by six tenths of a percent. health insurance giant united healthcare led its sector and the dow industrial stock average. trading volume almost doubled with the stock up 3%. on monday, the company's profit prediction for next year was less than anticipated. but with today's rally, shares have recovered from that sell- off and then some. retail continues to be in focus. the calendar month may not be over, but for several stores, the sales month for november is in the books. 17 chains reported sales at stores open for at least year. overall, sales were up 1.6%, according to thomson-reuters. that's only half the growth expected. the
the fiscal cliff, both sides now have put their opening offers on the table. last week, it was treasury secretary timothy geithner meeting with top republicans. this afternoon, house speaker john boehner sketched out the g.o.p. proposal in a letter to the white house, and the proposal borrows suggestions from the president's own debt reduction commission, whose plan was ignored last year. the republican letter offered $900 billion in spending cuts from program reforms to medicare and social security. the g.o.p. plan would raise $800 billion in revenues by closing loop-holes and reforming the tax code, but stops short of specifics. noticeably missing: the higher taxes on high-wage earners which president obama has insisted on. the white house responded, saying "the g.o.p. proposal does not meet the test of balance. in fact, it actually promises to lower rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill." it's not just the federal government under pressure. credit ratings agency fitch calls the fiscal cliff the biggest concern for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningfu
on this fiscal cliff issue. he particularly cited your report which he described as providing imperfect but fair middle ground as a way of breaking this political stalemate. he's saying only the president would adopt your approach that maybe this stalemate could be broken. what do you think about that? >> (laughing) well, i haven't seen the letter, as i think you know. it's nice that the speaker would give me some credit for trying to do that. but what he is referring to is when i testified before the super committee, i tried to show these guys that if they truly wanted to ghettoing that they could ghettoing at that time. and basically as an example on discretionary spending they were talking about cuts between $200-$400 billion. look, ghettoing on $300 billion. on health care between $500 billion and $700 billion. there was $600 billion. another mandatory that got that number that came out is $300 billion. both were talking about changing to the superlative c.p.i. so you could get $200 billion there and you'd have $400 billion come out of interest. that would be $1.8 trillion on top of the 1.3
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)